Juvenile Cape Cobra Defensive Behaviour

Also known as a “Koperkapel” or “Geelslang” in Afrikaans, the Cape Cobra is a common venomous snake that can range in colour from yellow through reddish brown to black.

When threatened or cornered, Cape Cobras are quick to spread a hood and won’t hesitate to bite. Their venom is highly neurotoxic (the most potent of any African cobra), attacking the nervous system and causing respiratory collapse (the victim stops breathing).

Cape Cobras feed on rodents, birds, lizards, toads, and other snakes.

Oviparous, they lay 8-20 eggs in mid-summer.

Find out more about this species here.

Cape Cobra Defensive Behaviour

Also known as a “Koperkapel” or “Geelslang” in Afrikaans, the Cape Cobra is a common venomous snake that can range in colour from yellow through reddish brown to black.

When threatened or cornered, Cape Cobras are quick to spread a hood and won’t hesitate to bite. Their venom is highly neurotoxic (the most potent of any African cobra), attacking the nervous system and causing respiratory collapse (the victim stops breathing).

Cape Cobras feed on rodents, birds, lizards, toads, and other snakes.

Oviparous, they lay 8-20 eggs in mid-summer.

Find out more about this species here.

Rhombic Egg-Eater Defensive Posturing

Although completely harmless, people often get a fright and kill Rhombic Egg-Eaters due to their defensive posturing – they coil their bodies and rub their keeled scales against each other to produce a loud hissing noise, then flatten their head and open their mouth whilst pretending to strike.

In reality they barely have any teeth, and they are completely harmless!

Mainly nocturnal, Rhombic Egg-Eaters feed exclusively on birds’ eggs. They have sharp protrusions on the inside of their spine that they use to crack an egg open after they’ve swallowed it, then they spit the shell back out.

Oviparous, they lay 6-25 eggs in summer.

Find out more about this species here.